Category: Executive Directors

An Executive Director is the CEO of a non-profit.  Many non-profits use the terms President or CEO.  CEO would be a more appropriate name so everyone understands the role the same way.

HE JUST SAID NO

Is No an Answer? Recently, an executive director responded to an email I had sent him letting him know about my services and products for non-profits.   Having been an executive director for some time, I started a business to assist non-profits with their issues which includes services for executive directors. The answer: No.  Nothing …

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Executive Directors and Stress

Executive Directors and Stress are Friendly Foes One of the greatest enemies of Executive Directors is stress but it can be friendly.  Why?  Because Stress is manageable through good organization practices. If an executive director recognizes that their office systems may be working against them, then at least one area of stress is eliminated.  Often, …

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Does It Take Too Long to Explain the Project to an Independent Contractor?

  Does the Time Taken to Work with an Independent   Contractor Worth It? Many executive directors believe they must do the work that cannot be done by others in the organization.  Often, executive directors simply don’t have enough staff for the workload required.  The hours get very long.  The stress builds.  Soon, the executive director …

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WHAT IS AN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR?

Define Executive Director . . . if you can Have you read some ads lately on job sites by non-profits wanting to hire executive directors?  If you haven’t, take a look. In my opinion, boards of directors are confused as to what an executive director is.  They seem to think that anyone can take on …

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Can Anxiety Impact the Executive Director’s Ability to Succeed?

Anxiety and the Executive Director Anxiety can be a daily companion for an executive director.  The expectations are high and the resources few.  Boards can be very demanding.  Staff may not appreciate the intensity of the position.  Clients see problems. And . . . then . . . there’s all the work to be done …

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